September 21 — Indian “3D” dance workshop — downtown

Contact: Space is limited. Email Madeline at mbell@flynncenter.org to reserve your spot.

Where and when: workshop, Flynn Mainstage, 2-3 p.m., FREE

Performance: Aparna Ramaswamy “Sannidha” FlynnSpace
Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 8pm
(Regularly: $30 adults; $26 students – free for you and your students when you take your class)

Bharatanatyam Workshop with Aparna Ramaswamy

Aparna Ramaswamy is co-director of Ragamala Dance and a protégé of legendary Bharatanatyam artist Alarmel Valli, one of India’s greatest living masters. Bharatanatyam has been described as “three-dimensional dance” and uses individual fingers, different parts of the sole of the foot, the spine, eyes, head, arms, and legs to create rhythms and dynamic contrasts.  Join Ramaswamy on the Flynn mainstage for an introduction to Bharatanatyam.  Please arrive 15 minutes early.

Here’s a recap of suggested ways to use this performance in your course:

 

Called “a marvel of buoyant agility and sculptural clarity” (Dance Magazine), Aparna Ramaswamy is co-director of Ragamala Dance and a protégé of legendary Bharatanatyam artist Alarmel Valli, one of India’s greatest living masters. Bharatanatyam has been described as “three-dimensional dance” and uses individual fingers, different parts of the sole of the foot, the spine, eyes, head, arms, and legs to create rhythms and dynamic contrasts. In Sannidhi, a solo piece with live music, Ramaswamy performs enchantingly beautiful dance that advances the classical form as a visceral, living tradition.

Self & Identity:
How does this modern take on a classical form demonstrate how our own personal/cultural history does/can affect our self-identity?
How does this solo performance of a traditionally group dance demonstrate how we select and appropriate aspects of the cultural around us into our individual identity?
How do/might our personal music and dance choices reflect/reveal/mask our self-identity?

Western History & Culture:
What aspects of the music and dance movements in this performance is/are different/similar, from/to those found in Western culture?
How do the music and dance movements reflect the culture from which it originated?
How do Western music and dance movements reflect Western culture?

Human Rights:
How might this type of dance be used to advocate for/celebrate/represent specific human rights?

Writing; Playwriting; Acting:
How does the dancer, as a solo performer, use the music, her body, and her face to connect with and communicate to the audience?

Psychology; Communication; Sexuality:
How could the movements from this performance be used to create a “dance” language of communication?
How might this type of dance be viewed in terms of sexuality in different cultures?

Art:
How would/might you use artistic methods/mediums to capture the individual movements and total effect of this performance?
How does the dancer use space (positive and negative) in ways similar to that of a sculptor?

Music:
How do the performer’s movements interact with the music?
What types of movement does this music evoke when you close your eyes?
Can you imagine this performance done to a different type of music? What would it be?
If you were to write a separate list of descriptors for the music and for the dance movements, what words would be on both lists? on only one of the lists?

Marketing/PR:
How would/might you promote this performance to a Western audience?
How would/might this differ from the way you would promote it in India?

Game Design:
If each movement within this performance was a skill or a power within a game, what might it represent? (Include facial feature, neck, finger, limb, and torso movements.)
What might the task or mission be within this game?
How might these movements, as performed by the dancer, improve the development of a character within a game?

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