February 23 — Woodwind quintet concert with all-American themes

Contact: Lois Price, price@champlain.edu, or Erik Esckilsen, esckilse@champlain.edu

When and Where: 7 p.m., Morgan Room, Aiken Hall — FREE

The program for this concert is described below this video.

Introduction:

As you can tell by the titles, some of the music in this concert is meant to graphically portray geographical features of the U.S. or to celebrate American folk song.

Themes: Americana, music as a means of expression, music connected to ideas/places/heritage, musicians working as team (community), etc.

Program:

Red Oak Suite by David Crowe…with movements called Harvest Hymn, County Fair Waltz and Barnyard Chase

Three tunes from Old American Songs by Aaron Copland: “Zion’s Walls,” “I Bought Me a Cat,” and “Ching-a-Ring Chaw”

Movements by Robert Muczynski

Quintet No. 2 by David Maslanka

Roaring Forksby Eric Ewazen…with movements called “Whitewater Rapids (Maroon Creek),” “Columbines (Snowmass Lake),” and “At the Summit (Buckskin Pass).@font-face { font-family: “Cambria”; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

Course links (a partial brainstormed list):

 

GDD and ART: Encounter the capacity of music to evoke imagery (and vice versa).

 

Digital Filmmaking and E-game: theme and motif music to create such effects as suspense, foreshadowing, subtext, and even characterization

Core:

Rhetoric: the evocative power of music and its capacity to reinforce rhetorical messages; the link between music and poetry as rhetorical forms

Concepts of Community: the orchestra as community; roles performed for the common good; music as an evocation of culture

Aesthetic Expressions: Here’s a great professional development opportunity for instructors in this course to deepen their knowledge of music as an aesthetic expression.

Secular and Sacred: Musical folkways, music’s role in religious practice

Capitalism and Democracy: Americana and cultural identity as expressed through music; use of music in politics and political movements (e.g., Civil Rights era, campaign themes)

Education: This is also a great professional development opportunity for Education faculty and students, as the quintet will discuss, in brief, the learning trajectory of a musician — and, who knows, maybe something about music education more generally.

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